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Concurrent Enrollment


To apply for the concurrent enrollment at BYU-Hawaii, you must complete the admissions application (fee waived) and submit it with a Concurrent Enrollment Voucher. A new voucher and application must be submitted for each enrollment period. All credits earned as a Concurrent Student will also be counted as college transfer credits. 
 
Applicant Requirements
• Has completed at least one quarter of their juinior year of high shool
• Has at least a 22 ACT or 980 SAT
• Has an unadjusted cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher
• Agrees to enroll for no more than 7 hours of university credits during any semester
• Understands that registration for daytime begins one month before the start of the semester
• Has unconditional support (i.e. early release approval) to attend BYUH as a concurrent student

 

The following is the list of classes available for concurrent enrollment students to register for:

ASL 101

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic signing and conversation. Language laboratory required.

TONGAN (TONG) 101

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary, reading included; language laboratory required.

CHINESE (CHIN) 101

Emphasis on conversation. Romanization, character reading, and basic grammar also included. Language laboratory required.

FRENCH (FREN) 101

 

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary, reading included; language laboratory required.

JAPANESE (JPN) 101

 

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary, reading included; language laboratory required.

MAORI (MAOR) 101

 

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary, reading included; language laboratory required.

SAMOAN (SAMN) 101

 

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary, reading included; language laboratory required.

SPANISH (SPAN) 101

 

Emphasis on conversation. Study of basic grammar and vocabulary, reading included; language laboratory required.

WORLD LANGUAGES (WLNG) 101

First semester study of a world language at the Elementary level

HAWN 101

 

He papa kumu mua e ho'omaka ai ke kama'aina 'ana I ka 'olelo Hawaii me na loina. E ho'oma'ama'a ana ma ka ho'olohe, 'olelo, heluhelu, me ke kakau. Kalele 'ia ka 'olelo. Part one of an introductory course designed to initiate and develop understanding, comprehension and fluency in the communicative skills of the Hawaiian language and culture.

HAWN 285R

 

Major areas of Hawaiian Student on a rotation basis:

-Hawaiian Hula and Mele

-Hawaiian La’au Lapa’au and Lomi Lomi

-Hawaiian Implements and Instructions

-Hawaiian Sports, Games: Pa’ani ho’oikaika

EXS 112 BEGINNING GOLF

 

Designed for those students wanting to learn the basic game of golf. Not for those with advanced skills. Fee required

EXS 113 INTERMEDIATE GOLF

 

This course is for students with good understanding of USGA rules and good basic skills.

EXS 115 BEGINNING BOWLING

 

Designed for those students wanting to learn the basic skills of bowling. Fee required.

EXS 126 ARCHERY

 

A beginning level course where students learn the basic fundamentals of archery.

EXS 129

FITNESS AND LIFESTYLE MANAGEMENT

 

An online course designed to teach principles and practices of a healthy lifestyle of wellness and being

EXS 131 BEGINNING TABLE TENNIS

 

Introduction to the sport of table tennis. Designed for those students who have had little or no previous experience in table tennis

EXS 132 INTERMEDIATE TABLE TENNIS

 

Development in the sport of table tennis. Designed for those students who have had previous experience in table tennis.

EXS 133 BEGINNING TENNIS

 

Designed for those students wanting to learn the basic skills of tennis

EXS 134 INTERMEDIATE TENNIS

 

This course is designed for those that completed a beginning level course or higher.

EXS 136 BADMINTON

 

Designed for those students that have had no previous experience in badminton.

EXS 140 BEGINNING BASKETBALL

 

Designed for those students wanting to learn the basic skills for participating in the game of basketball.

EXS 141 INTERMEDIATE BASKETBALL

 

Designed for those students that have completed a beginning level and wishing to participate on a more active level

EXS 144 BEGINNING VOLLEYBALL

 

Designed for those wanting to gain skills in playing the game of volleyball. Course is designed for more skill level development than game playing

EXS 146 BEGINNING SOCCER

 

Designed for those students wanting to gain skills to be able to participate in soccer

EXS 150

TOUCH RUGBY

 

A course designed to integrate the basic skills utilized in regulation rugby and touch football in a non-contact fashion. The course will provide physical and intellectual challenges of physical fitness, teamwork, and sportsmanship in a multi-cultural context.

EXS 152 

 SELF-DEFENSE

 

A course developed based on the principles of Aikido.

EXS 159 SOFTBALL

 

Beginning level course designed for those students wanting to learn the game of softball

EXS 160 BEGINNING SWIMMING

 

Course designed for the non-swimmer, and those wanting to develop their swimming and survival skills in the water

EXS 161 INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING

 

Course designed to raise the level of swimming skills to where the student can perform all the various swimming strokes and swim up to one mile

EXS 164     

LIFE SAVING

 

Students will receive lifeguard training along with first aid and CPR certification. Intermediate swimming skills required. Fee required

EXS 174R JOGGING

 

A course designed for those wanting to maintain an aerobic-based program using jogging as the basis for maintaining aerobic fitness

EXS 177 FITNESS FOR LIVING

 

A course designed to teach people how to take control of their personal health habits by practicing positive lifestyle activities that will decrease the risk of illness and help achieve total well-being.

EXS 178R WEIGHT TRAINING DEVELOPMENT

 

Course designed for those wanting experience in weight training. Topics vary and may include open classes, women-only classes, Olympic lifting classes, etc

Astronomy

(ASTR) 104

An introduction to modern astronomy.

Biology 

(BIOL) 100

 

A study of fundamental life processes and the development of biological concepts. Course includes molecular, organismal, and population biology.

Biology

 (BIOL) 112

 

An introductory course which covers genetics, cell, and molecular biology. Required of all biology and biochemistry majors and must be taken before any other biology course. (Corequisite: BIOL 112L)

Chemistry 

(CHEM) 100

A course designed to give non-science students an appreciation of our chemical world. Very basic concepts are presented which are then related to the chemistry all around us. The topics vary with instructor

 

Physical Science

 (PHSC) 100

 

An introduction to the basic concepts of physical science and the scientific method.

 

Physics 

(PHYS) 100

 

Nonmathematical approach to understanding the principles of physics and scientific numeracy. No previous background in physics required.

 

Psychology

 (PSYC) 111

 

Provides familiarity with the major subfields and methods of discovery used in psychology. Topics covered include the biology of behavior, human development across the lifespan, cognition and intelligence, social processes, personality, motivation, psychopathology and therapy. Provides an opportunity to "sample" many of the domains of the discipline, both in preparation for taking more focused courses in the major and to permit the application of psychological insights to other fields of endeavor.

 

Science

 (SCI) 99

 

The objective of this course is to help the students develop necessary reading and comprehension skills applicable, in general, to all science fields, and to improve the student's ability to learn.

 

Mathematics

 (MATH) 107

Practical applications of mathematics in the context of logic, finance, statistics, probability, and other areas.

 

Computer Science

 (CS) 200

Systems theory, quality, decision making and organizational role of information systems. Technology including computing and telecommunications. Concepts of organization and information systems growth and re-engineering.

 

Forensic Science 

(FORS) 100

A course designed for non-science students who are interested in exploring the field of forensic science. Basic concepts of forensic science will be discussed including crime scene investigation, DNA analysis, arson analysis, fingerprint analysis, drug analysis and trace evidence and trace evidence analysis; these topics may vary. 

 

Criminal Justice 

(CRMJ) 301

Introduction to the fundamentals of criminal justice, including crime and its consequences, law enforcement systems, ethics, policing, sentencing, and police institutions.

 

Business Management 

(BUSM) 180

 

The role of commercial enterprise in modern society, challenges inherent in starting and growing a business, core functions of management, exploration of career options.

 

Communications 

(COMM) 110

Designed to give students a broad introduction to the field of communication in a global information society. Explores the central role of intercultural communication for individuals and societies.

 

English 

(ENGL) 101

Learning critical awareness through developing effective writing, reading, and research skills by analyzing and critiquing literary and other texts.  Requires multiple kinds of writing, including a research paper.

 

Film Studies

 (FILM)

 

 

 

Geography

 (GEOG) 101

Physical features and natural resources of the world; the interrelationship between man and his natural environment; the influence of industry, climate, agriculture, and commerce; the interrelationship between the areas of geography and history.

 

Hawaiian Studies 

(HWST) 101

Course focused on the general introduction of Hawaiian culture, history, values, and practices through oral and practical traditions of the Hawaiian People as expressed in their chants, songs, music, art, crafts, food, language, and hospitality. Students engage in research, writing, composing, and sharing creative works linking principles of Hawaiian culture with their current real life situation. Students build a positive foundation in Hawaiian culture as it applies to their lives and will be able to further extend these practices beyond the boundaries of this institution.

 

History 

(HIST) 120

A study of the discovery and colonization of America, the Revolution, the forming of the government, and internal and foreign affairs down through the Civil War.

 

History

 (HIST) 121

The Civil War and its aftermath, industrialization, external expansion, two world wars, and domestic affairs from 1865 to the present.

Home Economics

 (HEC) 162

Application of construction principles using commercial patterns; selection, use, and care of equipment; and selection of textiles. Construction of garments and mini projects reflecting a wide range of sewing techniques. Fee required.

 

Hospitality and Tourism Management

(HTM) 133

This class is an introductory study of the Hospitality and Tourism industry. Its purpose is to familiarize the student with the structure of the industry and its principal components in preparation for more advanced studies. A secondary purpose is to investigate the types of jobs that are available in the industry so the student can make meaningful academic and career plans.

 

Intercultural Peacebuilding 

(IPB) 121

An interdisciplinary look at how to build peaceful families, communities, organizations and nations. Special emphasis will be placed on intercultural conflict.

 

Pacific Islands Studies 

(PAIS) 101

The course analyzes the impact of Pacific cultures and values in the context of higher education and the new setting. It identifies values and practices related to the "Pacific Way". It provides strategies to enable the major to be successful academically as well as in life. Areas of focus for the course include self-evaluation as well as adaptation and how to negotiate the system effectively. Exploring possible career paths in the Pacific region and preparing for employment.

 

Music

 (MUSC) 101

Designed to acquaint the student with concepts of form and style in music as exemplified in masterworks from the Middle Ages to the present.

 

Political Science

 (POSC) 101

An introduction to political theories, institutions, and ideologies with instruction in logic and communication.

 

Religion 

(REL) 100

Designed to introduce the culture, scriptures, and distinctive doctrines of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to students who are members of other religions and to those who have been members of the Church for less than one year. This course is intended mainly for first year freshmen and new transfer students, to prepare them for subsequent religion classes.

 

Student Development 

(STDEV)

 

 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

(TESOL)

 

 

Theatre (THEA)

115

A survey of the components of the theatre arts. Included are introductions to theatre history, dramatic literature and theory, play production, and criteria for performance evaluation. Play production surveys the skills of acting, directing, scenic design, costume design, lighting design, and playwriting. Attendance at selected stage productions is required.